September 2010

Northwest Territories

Flag of Northwest Territories

Flag of Northwest Territories

The flag of Northwest Territories was officially adopted in 1969.
It was chosen as the winning entry in a contest for a new flag. Blue is said to be symbolic of the many lakes and rivers in the territory, and white represents the ice and snow.
The white panel displays the shield from the territory’s coat of arms, one adopted in 1956. That shield uses green for forests, red for the tundra and white for the Arctic Circle ice cap. The wavy blue line represents the Northwest Passage. Gold blocks represent gold deposits in the territory, and the fox face is symbolic of fur as a natural resource.

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September 3, 2010
Northwest Territories

Nunavut

Flag of Nunavut

Flag of Nunavut

The Flag of Nunavut was proclaimed on 1 April 1999, along with the territory of  Nunavut in Canada. It features a red inukshuk—an Inuit land marker—and a blue star, which represents the Niqirtsuituq, the North Star, and the leadership of elders in the community. The colours represent the riches of the land, sea and sky. It was adopted following a process where input was sought from local communities and submissions were solicited from the Canadian public.

Source: Wikipedia

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September 3, 2010
Nunavut

Newfoundland and Labrador

The flag of Newfoundland and Labrador was introduced in 1980, and was designed by Newfoundland artist Christopher Pratt. The flag is nicknamed “The Golden Shaft”. The flag design, with the proportions 2:1, was approved by the House of Assembly of the province of Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada, on May 28, 1980. It was flown for the first time on Discovery Day; June 24, 1980.

The design was chosen due to its broad symbolism. The blue colour represents the sea, the white colour represents snow and ice of winter, the red colour represents the effort and struggle of Newfoundlanders and Labradorians, and the gold colour symbolizes the confidence Newfoundlanders and Labradorians have in themselves and for the future.
The blue triangles are meant as a tribute to the Union Flag, and stand for the British heritage of Newfoundland and Labrador. The two red triangles are meant to represent the two areas of the province — the mainland and the island. The gold arrow, according to Pratt, points towards a “brighter future”; the arrow becomes a sword, honouring the sacrifices of Newfoundlanders in military service when the flag is draped as a vertical banner. The red triangles and the gold arrow form a trident, symbolizing the province’s dependence on its fisheries and the resources of the sea.

Source: Wikipedia

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September 3, 2010
Newfoundland and Labrador

Prince Edward Island

The flag of Prince Edward Island, Canada is a banner modelled after the provincial arms. The flag has the proportions 2:3; the three sides away from the mast are bordered by alternating bands of red and white.
The upper third of the flag features the English heraldic lion which appeared both on the coat of arms of Prince Edward, Duke of Kent, for whom the province is named, and on that of King Edward VII. The lower two-thirds show an island on which appear three small oak saplings (on the left) – representing the three counties of PEI (Prince, Queens, and Kings) – under the protection of a great oak tree which represents Great Britain. This symbolism is also reflected in the provincial motto, Parva sub ingenti (the small under the protection of the great).

Source: Wikipedia

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September 3, 2010
Prince Edward Island

Nova Scotia

Flag of Nova Scotia

Flag of Nova Scotia

The Flag of Nova Scotia, created in 1858,  is a banner of the Coat of arms of Nova Scotia, which were granted to the Scottish colony by Charles I, King of Scots, in 1625.
The flag of the modern Canadian province, a blue saltire on a white field, is a simple figure-ground reversal of the flag of Scotland (a white saltire, Saint Andrew’s cross, on a blue field), charged with an inescutcheon bearing the royal arms of Scotland, a gold shield with a red lion rampant surrounded by a royal double tressure (a double border decorated with fleurs de lis). The royal arms do not appear on Scotland’s flag – they were added to Nova Scotia’s to distinguish the flag from the Naval Ensign of Russia which is also a blue saltire on a white field.
The similarity to the Scottish flag reflects the province’s name, which is Latin for “New Scotland.’ Nova Scotia was one of the few Canadian colonies to be granted its own Coat of Arms, and the flag is the only one of the Canadian provinces dating back to before confederation.

Source: Wikipedia

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September 3, 2010
Nova Scotia

New Brunswick

Flag of New Brunswick

Flag of New Brunswick

The flag of New Brunswick, Canada, is a banner modelled after the province’s coat of arms and was adopted by proclamation on February 24, 1965.

The flag has the proportions 8:5. A gold lion on the red field across the top one-third of the flag represents New Brunswick’s ties to both the Brunswick region in Germany and (the arms of) the Monarch of the United Kingdom. The lower two-thirds of the flag depicts a Spanish galley, the traditional representation of a ship in heraldry. It represents shipbuilding, one of the province’s main industries at the time the coat of arms was adopted and throughout much of the province’s history.

Source: Wikipedia

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September 3, 2010
New Brunswick

Quebec

Flag of Quebec

Flag of Quebec

The flag of Quebec, called the fleurdelisé, was adopted for the province by the government of Quebec, during the administration of Maurice Duplessis. It was the first provincial flag officially adopted in Canada, first shown on January 21, 1948, at the Parliament Building of the National Assembly in Quebec City. Quebec’s Flag Day — January 21 — commemorates its adoption each year, though for some time it was celebrated in May.[1] At least one parade marked the flag’s 60th anniversary in January 2008.

Source: Wikipedia

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September 3, 2010
Quebec

Manitoba

Flag of Manitoba

Flag of Manitoba

The Flag of Manitoba is a variation of the Red Ensign which bears the shield of the provincial coat of arms. This flag was approved by the passage of a bill in the Manitoba Legislative Assembly on May 11, 1965. Queen Elizabeth II having given permission for the use of the Union device in October 1965, it was officially proclaimed on 12 May 1966. The decision to adopt the flag was made after the federal government decided to replace the Canadian Red Ensign with the Maple Leaf flag. The flag of Ontario was adopted under similar circumstances.

Source: Wikipedia

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September 3, 2010
Manitoba

Saskatchewan

Flag of Saskatchewan

Flag of Saskatchewan

The flag of Saskatchewan features the armorial bearings (coat of arms) in the upper quarter nearest the staff, with the floral emblem, the western red lily, in the fly. The upper green half of the flag represents the northern Saskatchewan forest lands, while the gold lower half symbolizes the southern, prairie wheat-fields. The flag is constructed in the proportions 2:1.

The current flag of Saskatchewan was adopted on 22 September 1969, the result of a province-wide competition that drew over four thousand entries. The winning entry was designed by Anthony Drake of Hodgeville, Saskatchewan.
In 1964, a special flag was granted to Saskatchewan in honour of the province’s sixtieth anniversary. The flag features a stylized stalk of wheat towards the staff and the provincial coat of arms in the upper quarter further from the staff. The flag’s background is red in its upper half and green in its lower half. The symbolism of the flag’s colours is similar to that of the official provincial flag: red symbolizes the fires that once ravaged the prairies, green symbolizes agricultural cultivation and life, and gold symbolizes the wheat fields. This flag appears in both 3:2 and 2:1 ratios, and it is not used officially.

Source: Wikipedia

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September 3, 2010
Saskatchewan

Alberta

Flag of Alberta

Flag of Alberta

In 1958, the Alberta Government authorized the design of an official flag. On 1 June 1968, the Flag of Alberta, Canada was adopted .

The custom flag has the proportions 1:2, with the provincial shield of arms in the centre of a royal ultramarine blue background. The shield’s height is 7/11 that of the flag’s height.
The provincial colours, adopted in 1984, are blue and gold (deep yellow); they are also referred to as ‘Alberta blue’ and ‘Alberta gold,’ appearing on the flag/shield in the sky/background and wheat background, respectively.
Source: Wikipedia

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September 3, 2010
Alberta

British Columbia

Flag of British Columbia

Flag of British Columbia

The Flag of British Columbia is based upon the shield of the provincial arms of British Columbia. At the top of the flag is a rendition of the Union Flag, defaced in the centre by a crown, representing the province’s origins as a British colony, with a setting sun below.

Source: Wikipedia

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September 2, 2010
British Columbia

Ontario

Flag of Ontario

Flag of Ontario

The Custom Flag of Ontario was enacted as the official flag of the Canadian province of Ontario by the Flag Act on May 21, 1965. The flag is a defaced Red Ensign, with the Union Flag in the canton and the Ontario shield of arms in the fly.

Source: Wikipedia

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September 2, 2010
Ontario